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England
170px-England crest 2009 svg
Nickname(s) The Three Lions
Association The Football Association
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Vacant
Captain Wayne Rooney
Most caps James Harrison (185)
Top scorer James Harrison (86)
FIFA code ENG
FIFA ranking 13 11px-Decrease2.svg 2 (14 July 2016)
Highest FIFA ranking (August 2012)
Lowest FIFA ranking 27 (February 1996)
Elo ranking 11 (10 July 2016)
Highest Elo ranking 1 (1872–1876, 1892–1911, 1966–1970, 1987–1988)
Lowest Elo ranking 16 (19 June 2014)
First international
Flag of Scotland.svg Scotland 0–0 England Flag of England.svg
(Partick, Scotland; 31 July 1872)
Biggest win
St Patrick's saltire svg Ireland 0–13 England Flag of England.svg
(Belfast, Ireland; 31 July 1882)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Hungary (1949-1956) svg Hungary 7–1 England Flag of England.svg
(Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954)
World Cup
Appearances 14 (First in 1950)
Best result Champions, 1966
European Championships
Appearances 9 (First in 1968)
Best result Third Place, 1968
Semi-finals, 1996

The England national football team represents England at football and is controlled by The Football Asociation, the governing body for football. England are one of the two oldest national teams in football; alongside Scotland, whom they played in the world's first international football match in 1872. England is one of the United Kingdom's Home Nations, meaning that it is permitted by FIFA to maintain its own national side. England's home ground is Wembley Stadium, London, and the most recent manager was Roy Hodgson who resigned after England exited Euro 2016.

England contest the FIFA World Cup and UEFA European Championships, which alternate biennially. England won the World Cup in 1996, when they hosted the finals, defeating West Germany 4–2 in extra time in the final,

HistoryEdit

The England national football team is the joint-oldest in the world; it was formed at the same time as Scotland. A representative match between England and Scotland was played on 5 March 1870, having been organised by the Football Association. A return fixture was organised by representatives of Scottish football teams on 30 November 1872. This match, played at Hamilton Crescent in Scotland, is viewed as the first official international football match, because the two teams were independently selected and operated, rather than being the work of a single football association. Over the next forty years, England played exclusively with the other three Home Nations—Scotland, Wales and Ireland—in the British Home Championship.

To begin with, England had no permanent home stadium. They joined FIFA in 1906 and played their first ever games against countries other than the Home Nations on a tour of Central Europe in 1908. Wembley Stadium was opened in 1923 and became their home ground. The relationship between England and FIFA became strained, and this resulted in their departure from FIFA in 1928, before they rejoined in 1946. As a result, they did not compete in a World Cup until 1950, in which they were beaten in a 1–0 defeat by the United States, failing to get past the first round in one of the most embarrassing defeats in the team's history. Their first ever defeat on home soil to a foreign team was a 0–2 loss to the Republic of Ireland on 21 September 1949 at Goodison Park. A 6–3 loss in 1953 to Hungary, was their second defeat by a foreign team at Wembley. In the return match in Budapest, Hungary won 7–1. This still stands as England's worst ever defeat. After the game, a bewildered Syd Owen said, "it was like playing men from outer space".

In the 1954 World Cup, two goals by Ivor Broadis saw him become the first England player to score two goals in a game at the World Cup finals. He beat Nat Lofthouse by 30 minutes when both scored 2 each in a thrilling 4–4 draw against Belgium. After reaching the quarter-finals for the first time, England lost 4–2 to Uruguay.

England 66

England line-up for the 1966 World Cup final.

Although Walter Winterbottom was appointed as England's first ever full-time manager in 1946, the team was still picked by a committee until Alf Ramsey took over in 1963. The 1966 World Cup was hosted in England and Ramsey guided England to victory with a 4–2 win against West Germany after extra time in the final, during which Geoff Hurst famously scored a hat-trick. England qualified for the 1970 World Cup in Mexico as reigning cup holders. They reached the quarter-finals but were knocked out by West Germany. England had been 2–0 up but were eventually beaten 3–2 after extra time. They failed in qualification for the 1974, leading to Alf Ramsey's dismissal, and 1978 World Cups. Under Ron Greenwood they managed to qualify for the 1982 World Cup in Spain (the first time competitively since 1962), but were eliminated from a second qualifying round comprising further group matches without losing a game all tournament. The team under Bobby Robson fared better as England reached the quarter-finals of the 1986 World Cup, losing 2–1 to Argentina in a game made famous by two goals by Maradona for very contrasting reasons, before losing every match at the Euro 88 tournament. They next went on to achieve their second best result in the 1990 World Cup by finishing fourth – losing again to West Germany in a semi-final finishing 1–1 after extra time, then 3–4 in England's first penalty shoot-out. Despite finishing fourth the members of the England team were given bronze medals identical to the Italians. The England team of 1990 were welcomed home as heroes and thousands of people lined the streets for a spectacular open-top bus parade.

The 1990s saw four England managers, each in the role for a relatively brief period. Graham Taylor was Robson's successor, but left after England failed to qualify for the 1994 World Cup. At Euro 96, held in England, Terry Venables led England equaling their best performance at a European Championship, reaching the semifinals as they did in 1968. He resigned following investigations into his financial activities. His successor, Glenn Hoddle, similarly left the job for non-footballing reasons after just one international tournament – the 1998 World Cup — in which England were eliminated in the second round again by Argentina and again on penalties (after a 2–2 draw). Following Hoddle's departure, Kevin Keegan took England to Euro 2000, but performances were disappointing and he resigned shortly afterwards.

Sven-Göran Eriksson took charge of the team between 2001 and 2006 and was the first non-English manager of England. Despite controversial press coverage of his personal life, Eriksson was consistently popular with the majority of fans. He guided England to the quarter-finals of the 2002 World Cup and 2006 World Cup. He lost only five competitive matches during his tenure and England rose to a No.4 world ranking under his guidance. His contract was extended by the Football Association by two years, however it was terminated by them at the 2006 World Cup's conclusion.

Steve McClaren was appointed as head coach. His reign yielded little success, with England failing to qualify for Euro 2008. McClaren was sacked unanimously by The Football Association on 22 November 2007 after only 16 months in charge. This made him the shortest-lasting full-time England manager since the inauguration of the post in 1946. He was replaced on 14 December 2007 by the former Real Madrid and FC Juventus manager Fabio Capello. Capello took charge of his first game on 6 February 2008 against Switzerland, in which England won 2–1. Under Capello, England won all but one of their qualifying games for the 2010 World Cup. A 5–1 victory over Croatia at Wembley ensured the team qualified for the final tournament with two games to spare, a feat that had never been achieved before.

At the 2010 World Cup itself England drew their opening two games leading to questions about the team's spirit, tactics and ability to handle pressure. They progressed to the next round, where they were beaten 4–1 by Germany, their heaviest defeat in a World Cup.

In February 2012, Fabio Capello resigned from his role as England manager, following a disagreement with the FA over their request to remove John Terry from team captaincy after accusations of racial abuse concerning the player.

Following this, there was media speculation that Harry Redknapp would take the job. However, on 1 May 2012, Roy Hodgson was announced as the new manager, just six weeks before UEFA Euro 2012. England managed to finish top of their group, winning two and drawing one of their fixtures, but exited the Championships in the quarter-finals via a penalty shoot-out, this time to Italy.

In the 2014 FIFA World Cup, England were eliminated at the group stage for the first time since the 1958 World Cup, and the first time at a major tournament since Euro 2000. England's points total of one from three matches was its worst ever in the World Cup, obtaining one point from drawing against Costa Rica in their last match. England qualified for UEFA Euro 2016, with 10 wins from 10 qualifying matches, but were ultimately eliminated in the Round of 16, losing 2–1 to Iceland.

Current SquadEdit

# Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 GK Joe Hart 19 April 1987 (age 29) 63 0 Manchester City
13 GK Fraser Forster
GK
2 DF
3 DF
5 DF
6 DF
12 DF
15 DF
16 DF
DF
4 MF
7 MF
8 MF
11 MF
17 MF
19 MF
20 MF
MF
MF
9 FW Jamie Vardy 11 January 1987 (age 28) 4 0 Leicester City
10 FW Harry Kane 28 July 1993 (age 22) 6 3 Tottenham Hotspur
14 FW Theo Walcott 16 March 1989 (age 26) 42 8 Arsenal
18 FW James Wilson 1 December 1995 (age 20) 5 5 Manchester United
FW Wayne Rooney 24 October 1985 (age 29) 107 50 Manchester United

Results and fixturesEdit

Date Competition Location Opponent Score Scorers
2015
27 March 2015 Euro 2016 qualifying Wembley Stadium , London, England Lithuania 4–0 Rooney 7', Welbeck 45', Sterling 58', Kane 73'
31 March 2015 Friendly Juventus Stadium, Turin, Italy Italy 1–1 Townsend 79'
7 June 2015 Friendly Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Ireland Ireland 0–0
14 June 2015 Euro 2016 qualifying Stadion Stozice, Ljubljana, Slovenia Slovenia 3–2 Wilshere 57', 73', Rooney 86'
5 September 2015 Euro 2016 qualifying Stadio Olímpico, Serravalle, San Marino San Marino 6–0 Rooney 13' (pen.), Brolli 30' (o.g.), Barkley 46', Walcott 68', 78', Kane 77'
8 September 2015 Euro 2016 qualifying Wembley Stadium, London, England Switzerland 2–0 Kane 67', Rooney 84' (pen.)
9 October 2015 Euro 2016 qualifying Wembley Stadium, London, England Estonia 2–0 Walcott 45', Sterling 85'
12 October 2015 Euro 2016 qualifying LFF Stadium, Vilinus, Lithuania Lithuania 3–0 Barkley 29', Arlauskis 35' (o.g.), Oxlade-Chamberlain 62'
13 November 2015 Friendly Estadio José Rico Pérez, Alicante, Spain Spain
17 November 2015 Friendly Wembley Stadium, London, England France

RecordsEdit

Main article: England national football team records

Players in Bold are still active in professional football, those noted in italics are still active with the national team

Most Capped PlayersEdit

# Name Career Caps Goals Position
1 Peter Shilton 1970–1990 125 0 GK
Steven Gerrard 2000–2014 125 36 MF
3 Frank Lampard 1999– 117 35 MF
4 David Beckham 1996–2009 115 17 MF
5 Bobby Moore 1962–1973 108 2 DF
6 Ashley Cole 2001–2014 107 1 DF
7 Bobby Charlton 1958–1970 106 49 FW
8 Wayne Rooney 2003– 105 72 FW
Billy Wright 1946–1959 105 3 DF
10 Bryan Robson 1980–1991 90 26 MF

Top GoalscorersEdit

Goalscorers with an equal number of goals are ranked with the highest to lowest goals per game ratio.

# Name Career Goals Caps Position Average
1 Wayne Rooney 2003– 72 105 FW 0.6857
2 Bobby Charlton 1958–1970 49 106 FW 0.4623
3 Gary Lineker 1984–1992 48 80 FW 0.6000
4 Jimmy Greaves 1959–1967 44 57 FW 0.7719
5 Michael Owen 1998–2008 40 89 FW 0.4494
6 Steven Gerrard 2000–2014 36 125 MF 0.2880
7 Frank Lampard 1999– 35 117 MF 0.2991
8 Nat Lofthouse 1950–1958 30 33 FW 0.9090
Alan Shearer 1992–2000 30 63 FW 0.4762
Tom Finney 1946–1958 30 76 FW 0.3947

Managerial recordsEdit

Years Manager Played Won Drawn Lost For Against Diff Win % Loss %
1872–1939 FA Selection Committee 226 138 37 51 674 293 +381 61% 23%
1946–62 Walter Winterbottom 139 78 32 28 383 196 +187 56% 20%
1963–74 Alf Ramsey 113 69 27 17 224 98 +126 61% 15%
1974 Joe Mercer 7 3 3 1 9 7 +2 43% 14%
1974–77 Don Revie 29 14 8 7 49 25 +24 48% 24%
1977–82 Ron Greenwood 55 33 12 10 93 40 +53 60% 22%
1982–90 Bobby Robson 95 47 30 18 154 60 +94 49% 19%
1990–93 Graham Taylor 38 18 13 7 62 32 +30 47% 18%
1994–96 Terry Venables 24 11 11 1 35 14 +21 46% 4%
1996–98 Glenn Hoddle 28 17 6 5 42 13 +29 61% 18%
1999, 2000 Howard Wilkinson 2 0 1 1 0 2 −2 0% 50%
1999–2000 Kevin Keegan 18 7 7 4 26 15 +11 39% 22%
2000 Peter Taylor 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 0% 100%
2001–06 Sven-Goran Eriksson 67 40 17 10 128 61 +67 60% 15%
2006–07 Steve McClaren 18 9 4 5 32 12 +20 50% 22%
2008–12 Fabio Capello 42 28 8 6 89 35 +54 67% 14%
2012 Stuart Pearce 1 0 0 1 2 3 −1 0% 100%
2012–present James Harrison 42 41 1 0 165 8 +177 98% 0%
Total 945 543 217 173 2167 915 +1252 57% 18%

By OpponentEdit

Opponent Played Won Drawn Lost For Against Diff Win % Loss %
 Albania 4 4 0 0 12 1 +11 100% 0%
 Algeria 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0% 0%
 Andorra 4 4 0 0 16 0 +16 100% 0%
 Argentina 15 7 5 2 27 15 +12 47% 13%
 Australia 6 3 2 1 6 5 +1 50% 16%
 Austria 18 10 4 4 58 27 +31 56% 22%
 Azerbaijan 2 2 0 0 3 0 +3 100% 0%
 Belarus 2 2 0 0 6 1 +5 100% 0%
 Belgium 21 15 5 1 72 25 +47 71% 5%
 Bohemia 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
 Brazil 26 6 9 11 30 32 −2 23% 42%
 Bulgaria 10 6 4 0 16 2 +14 60% 0%
 Cameroon 4 3 1 0 9 4 +5 75% 0%
 Canada 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100% 0%
 Chile 6 3 2 1 9 4 +5 50% 17%
 China PR 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100% 0%
 Colombia 5 3 2 0 10 3 +7 60% 0%
 Commonwealth of Independent States 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 0% 0%
 Costa Rica 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100% 0%
 Croatia 7 4 1 2 18 10 +8 57% 29%
 Cyprus 2 2 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
 Czech Republic 2 1 1 0 4 2 +2 50% 0%
 Czechoslovakia 12 7 3 2 25 15 +10 58% 17%
 Denmark 19 12 4 3 38 19 +19 63% 16%
 East Germany 4 3 1 0 7 3 +4 75% 0%
 Ecuador 3 3 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
 Egypt 3 3 0 0 8 1 +7 100% 0%
 Estonia 2 2 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
 FIFA European Select 2 1 1 0 7 4 +3 50% 0%
 FIFA World Select 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100% 0%
 Finland 11 9 2 0 36 7 +29 82% 0%
 France 29 17 4 8 68 35 +33 59% 28%
 Georgia 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
 Germany 15 9 1 5 35 20 +15 60% 33%
 Ghana 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0% 0%
 Greece 10 8 2 0 27 3 +24 80% 0%
 Honduras 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
 Hungary 22 15 2 5 56 30 +26 68% 23%
 Iceland 2 1 1 0 7 2 +5 50% 0%
 Ireland (IFA) (1882–1950)  57 46 8 3 230 49 +181 81% 5%
 Israel 4 2 2 0 5 1 +4 50% 0%
 Italy 25 10 6 9 35 30 +5 40% 36%
 Jamaica 1 1 0 0 6 0 +6 100% 0%
 Japan 4 3 1 0 10 3 +7 75% 0%
 Kazakhstan 2 2 0 0 9 1 +8 100% 0%
 Kuwait 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100% 0%
 Liechtenstein 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 100% 0%
 Luxembourg 9 9 0 0 47 3 +44 100% 0%
 Macedonia 4 2 2 0 5 3 +2 50% 0%
 Malaysia 1 1 0 0 4 2 +2 100% 0%
 Malta 3 3 0 0 8 1 +7 100% 0%
 Mexico 11 8 1 2 30 4 +26 72% 18%
 Moldova 4 4 0 0 21 0 +21 100% 0%
 Montenegro 4 2 2 0 9 3 +6 50% 0%
 Morocco 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 50% 0%
 Netherlands 20 6 9 5 30 24 +6 30% 25%
 New Zealand 2 2 0 0 3 0 +3 100% 0%
 Nigeria 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 50% 0%
 Northern Ireland (1950—) 41 29 8 4 93 32 +61 71% 10%
 Norway 11 6 3 2 29 7 +22 55% 18%
 Paraguay 3 3 0 0 8 0 +8 100% 0%
 Peru 3 2 0 1 11 4 +7 67% 33%
 Poland 19 12 6 1 34 10 +24 63% 5%
 Portugal 22 9 10 3 45 25 +20 41% 17%
 Republic of Ireland 15 6 6 2 24 13 +11 40% 13%
 Romania 11 2 6 3 10 10 0 18% 27%
 Russia 2 1 0 1 4 2 +2 50% 50%
 San Marino 4 4 0 0 37 1 +36 100% 0%
 Saudi Arabia 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 0% 0%
 Scotland 111 46 24 41 197 170 +27 41% 37%
 Serbia-Montenegro 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100% 0%
 Slovakia 3 3 0 0 8 2 +6 100% 0%
 Slovenia 2 2 0 0 3 1 +2 100% 0%
 South Africa 2 2 0 0 4 2 +2 100% 0%
 South Korea 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0% 0%
 Soviet Union 11 5 3 3 19 13 +6 45% 27%
 Spain 25 14 3 8 46 25 +21 56% 32%
 Sweden 24 8 10 6 39 28 +11 33% 25%
 Switzerland 22 14 5 3 52 19 +33 64% 14%
 Trindad & Tobago 2 2 0 0 5 0 +5 100% 0%
 Tunisia 2 1 1 0 3 1 +2 50% 0%
 Turkey 10 8 2 0 31 0 +31 80% 0%
 Ukraine 7 6 0 1 14 2 +12 86% 14%
 United States 10 7 1 2 36 9 +27 70% 20%
 Uruguay 12 5 3 4 16 13 +3 42% 33%
 Wales 101 66 21 14 245 90 +155 65% 14%
 West Germany 16 6 4 6 21 19 +2 38% 38%
 Yugoslavia 14 5 5 4 23 20 +3 36% 29%
 Galatasaray (unofficial) 1 0 1 0 0 0 +0 0% 0%
 Fenerbahçe (unofficial) 1 0 0 1 3 0 +3 100% 0%
Total 945 543 217 173 2167 915 +1252 57% 18%

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